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Swinburne Library Blog

Three easy ways to add Swinburne Commons videos to Blackboard

Posted March 03, 2015 in category General by Nyssa Parkes

Image: Swinburne Commons banner

Add any Swinburne Commons video to your Blackboard units...

1 - PUSH

1. Log into Swinburne Commons with SIMS

2. When viewing any video, click Add to Blackboard on the right

Image: Add to Blackbord

3.  Follow the prompts to 'Add resource summary' to your desired unit/s

2 - PULL

1. From your Blackboard unit content area, click Tools > Swinburne Commons

2. Search for the video and click + Select summary page

Image: Swinburne Commons pull

3. Click Save

3 - EMBED

1. When viewing an Open Access video in Swinburne Commons, expand and copy the embed code:

Image: Swinburne Commons embed code

2. In your Blackboard unit, click Build Content > Item and give the item a name

3. Click the HTML icon
    (you may need to expand the tools first)

Image: Blackboard html icon 

4. Paste in the embed code

5. Click Submit

> This embed option presents a full video player in your Blackboard content area.
> To obtain embed codes for restricted videos that you have created, contact commons@swin.edu.au .
> This option is not available for TV material.


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2nd March is Dr Seuss Day!

Posted March 02, 2015 in category General by Sue FOSTER

Theodor Seuss Geisel (Dr. Seuss) was born on March 2nd 1904.

He was a an illustrator for advertising campaigns and a political cartoonist during the Second World War, but is best remembered for his forty-six whimsical, rhyming children's books.

Several of the books have been adapted into films, including "Horton Hears a Who!", "The Lorax" and "The Cat in the Hat".

Look, it's a book!


Although he died in 1991, a new Dr. Seuss book is due this July! "What pet should I get?" is based on original manuscripts and sketches discovered in a box when his widow was remodeling her home. Random House plans to publish two further books.

Our Hawthorn Campus Library has a display today showcasing Dr. Seuss books from our Children's Picture Book collection.


We also have some e-books on his life and work including: Dr. Seuss; Theodor Seuss Geisel; and The Man Who Was Dr Seuss The Life and Work of Theodor Geisel.

 

 Image Credit: Flickr: Broken Simulacra:  Lorax Grafitti, Martin Place St Kilda


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Swinburne CodeCasts

Posted February 24, 2015 in category General by Nyssa Parkes

New in 2015: Swinburne CodeCasts

A suite of open access programming tutorials developed by Dr. Andrew Cain, Jake Renzella, Reuben Wilson, and Cliff Warren from the Faculty of Science, Engineering and Technology.

Twenty-six episodes on 'Programming in Pascal' are now available via Swinburne Commons, but viewers can also subscribe via YouTube , iTunes U or RSS to work through episodes published weekly.

 

 CodeCasts are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution License.

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Australia's best business writing

Posted February 20, 2015 in category General by Jane O'Donnell

The State Library of NSW announced the four fascinating books shortlisted in the 2014 Ashurst Business Literature Prize - Australia's richest and most prestigious award for business writing.

The shortlisted authors and titles are:

Andrew Burrell  Twiggy: The High Stakes Life of Andrew Forrest  (Black Inc)

Ben Hills  Stop the Presses: How Greed, Incompetence (and the Internet) Wrecked Fairfax (ABC Books/HarperCollins)

Margaret Simons  Kerry Stokes: Self-Made Man (Penguin Group Australia)

Rodney Tiffen  Rupert Murdoch: A Reassessment (NewSouth)

 

 

 https://www.flickr.com/photos/85178576@N02/7802400734/

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Spotlight on Italian Cinema

Posted February 11, 2015 in category General by Sue FOSTER

Attention Cinema Studies and Italian language students!

ACMI's latest film season "ROMA! The Screen Life of the Eternal City" begins this week with Melbourne Cinémathèque screening a season of Antonioni's films including La Notte, Il Grido, The Passenger, Identification of a Woman, and Zabriskie Point.

Because Swinburne teaches cinema studies and also Italian language studies, Swinburne Library has recently acquired many classic Italian films as online streaming videos. For an overview of Italian cinema Martin Scorsese's "My voyage to Italy" is the best place to start with episodes devoted to major influences like Roberto Rossellini, Vittorio De Sica, Luchino Visconti, Frederico Fellini, and Michelangelo Antonioni. We have many of the films Scorsese mentions like ...

ROSSELLINI: Rome Open City, Roberto Rossellini
DE SICA: The Bicycle thieves, Umberto D, To Live
FELLINI: 8 1/2, Roma, Satyricon, Amarcord, Nights of Cabiria, Spirits of the dead, Juliette Of The Spirits, Ginger and Fred, Voice Of The Moon
VISCONTI: Rocco and his brothers, La terra trema, Death in Venice, Luchino Visconti   
ANTONIONI: Blow Up, Zabriskie Point, The Oberwald Mystery  
PASOLINI:  Mamma Roma, The Decameron

We also have an extensive selection of Italian dvds in the Library's audiovisual section.

Image Credit: Flickr Thomas Hawk

To view online videos you will be asked for your Swinburne username and password to login.
They are made available for educational purposes under Part VA of the Copyright Act 1968 and access is restricted to Swinburne staff and students only. 
The material is subject to copyright. Any further copying or communication may be the subject of copyright or performers' protection under the Copyright Act 1968

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New on Swinburne Commons (February 2015)

Posted February 10, 2015 in category General by Nyssa Parkes

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Rub a dub dub, time to read in the tub!

Posted February 09, 2015 in category General by Sue FOSTER

February 9th is Read in the Bathtub Day. Enjoy a long soak with a great book.

Read in the Bathtub Day is the perfect excuse to turn off your electronic devices...
(unless it's an e-reader, then ziplock bag + Kindle = happy bathtub reading).

Remember, February is also "Love Your Library Month" so be careful with any borrowed books, remember to keep your book high and dry.

Image credit: Flickr ericsnaps  https://www.flickr.com/photos/ericsnaps/3385868072
Bathing in knowledge by Vanessa Mancini snapped at Bayswater Art Gallery

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February 2nd is World play your ukulele day!

Posted February 02, 2015 in category General by Sue FOSTER

The ukelele was developed in Hawaii in the 1880s based on instruments brought to Hawaii by Portuguese whalers who jumped ship and by immigrants from Madeira who came to work on the sugar cane fields.

King Kalkaua was a big fan and featured it in performances at royal gatherings which made it gain popularity.

From the 1920s through to the 1960's the ukulele's popularity spread to the USA, Canada, Japan and the UK. George Formby and Tiny Tim had many comedy hits that featured it.

Hawaiian musician Israel Kamakawiwo'ole's version of "Over the Rainbow" was used in films and commercials many years after he recorded it, leading to it reaching #12 on the Billboard chart in January 2004.

YouTube became a big influence on the popularity of the ukulele. Jake Shimabukuro's ukulele version of "While My Guitar Gently Weeps" was one of the first clips to go viral.

The groundwork for the current ukulele revival can be traced to mid-1990s underground culture which cannibalized popular elements like tattoos, burlesque, skateboarding, and Tiki culture leading to it featuring in art by pop surrealists like Shag, Mark Ryden and Brad Parker and being adopted by musicians like Amanda Palmer and Zooey Deschanel.

The Library has its own ukelele band so we have many uke books ...
including self help guides like Ukulele In A Day For Dummies, Ukulele Exercises For Dummies, The Ukulele Entertainer Powerful Pointers for Players and Performers
and also books on The 'ukulele a history, Ukulele Nation The Poetry of Uke, Incredible Hawaii

See the amazing story of the ukelele in the online streaming documentary "Mighty Uke

The 2015 Melbourne Ukulele Festival, Friday 13th to Sunday 15th March will have live uke performances.


Image credit:  Flickr  BoomerangThang

To view online videos you will be asked for your Swinburne username and password to login.
They are made available for educational purposes under Part VA of the Copyright Act 1968 and access is restricted to Swinburne staff and students only. 
The material is subject to copyright. Any further copying or communication may be the subject of copyright or performers' protection under the Copyright Act 1968


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Contemporary Issues in Business and Government - Vol 20, No 1 (2014)

Posted January 21, 2015 in category General by Nyssa Parkes

Contemprary IssuesThe latest issue of Contemporary Issues in Business and Government (CIBG) is now available:

 
Contemporary Issues in Business and Government aims to advance our understanding of cutting edge issues in theory and practice that inform business decision making and/or government policy.

The latest issue covers a range of topics that include the privatisation of prison systems, global financial standards, international economics, e-governance and the role of education in reinventing cities and regions.

Swinburne-authored papers in this issue include:

The online version of CIBG is made available by Swinburne Library's Online Journals service on behalf of Swinburne's Faculty of Business and Law.

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New on Swinburne Commons (January 2015)

Posted January 14, 2015 in category General by Nyssa Parkes

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Attention Creative Arts Students! Pause Fest is back in Melbourne in 2015.

Posted January 06, 2015 in category General by Cleve Carvalho

Pause Fest returns to Melbourne from 9 - 15 February 2015: "Exploring the intersection of creativity, technology and entrepreneurship"


Pause Fest is Australia's premier digital creative festival. It's aim is to create a more robust and representative digital eco-system in Australia by: 

  • Showcasing the best in digital culture and creativity from Australia and around the world 
  • Developing long term partnerships with like-minded and progressive organisations, to raise awareness and understanding of digital best practice in the wider community 

The event represents a unique opportunity for locals to connect, collaborate and launch projects alongside global leaders and visionary brands. Others connect with Pause to: 

  • Learn new skills
  • Address industry pain points
  • Finding a new challenge
  • Finding a mentor
  • Finding a co-founder or inventor 
Pause also server as a test platform for the creative experimentation of many innovators.

Find out more about this event from Pause web page.

 Image credit: Flickr/Pausefest


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January 2nd is Science Fiction day

Posted January 02, 2015 in category General by Sue FOSTER

January 2nd was selected because it's the birthday of science fiction author Isaac Asimov.

Celebrate by reading authors like Philip K. Dick, Robert Heinlein, Arthur C. Clarke, Kurt Vonnegut, and William Gibson.

Have a movie marathon with dvds from the Library including:
2001: a Space Odyssey,
Blade Runner, Alien, Predator, The Terminator, Robocop, Barbarella, The Fifth Element, Starship Troopers, Galaxy Quest, Gattaca, Silent Running, The Matrix, Back To The Future, Dannie Darko, Moon.

Did you know that the first ever science fiction movie was Georges Méliès "Le Voyage dans la Lune" (A Trip to the Moon) which was released in France on Sept 1st 1902. The silent black-and-white film is based on books by Jules Verne and H. G. Wells and tells the story of men who use a giant cannon to travel to the moon and meet space creatures. The Library has online streaming video of A Trip to the Moon and also a documentary about it called The extraordinary voyage.

Find out more about the pioneers of science fiction with these TV series from the BBC and Science Channel:

The real history of science fiction:  Time; Invasion; Space; Robots
Prophets Of Science Fiction: Jules Verne; Mary Shelley; H.G. Wells; Arthur C Clarke; Robert Heinlein; George Lucas

Or watch this groovy documentary to see how the Dr. Who theme music originated  ... What The Future Sounded Like 


Image credit: Flickr Libraries ACT

To view online videos you will be asked for your Swinburne username and password to login.
They are made available for educational purposes under Part VA of the Copyright Act 1968 and access is restricted to Swinburne staff and students only. 
The material is subject to copyright. Any further copying or communication may be the subject of copyright or performers' protection under the Copyright Act 1968

New on Swinburne Commons (December 2014)

Posted December 05, 2014 in category General by Nyssa Parkes

December 5th is International Ninja Day

Posted December 04, 2014 in category General by Sue FOSTER

Did you know that International Ninja Day is this Friday?

Australia's first experience with ninja was in 1964 when Channel 9 bought the first series of The Samurai and screened it on Australian TV.  Shintaro roamed 17th century Japan protecting the innocent and fighting evil ninjas dressed in black who could leap into trees backwards and stick to ceilings like flies. Due to poor English dubbing, Shintaro would make long speeches and the English audio would deliver one or two words while Ninja would move their lips for short words and the English audio would gush out complete sentences.

It was so popular that Channel 9 repeated it 3 times that year and an entrepreneur brought out the star from Japan to appear in a stage play based on the series which played to full houses in Sydney and Melbourne.

In school playgrounds children were emulating ninja by jumping off roofs and trees and making 'star-knives' out of cardboard and jam tin lids ... to the consternation of parents and teachers.  Toy stores were selling black pajamas as 'ninja' costumes and Scanlen's chewing-gum brought out a set of cards based on photos from the series.

Why it was so popular in Australia baffled TV programmers, the press, parents and even the Japanese star and production company. The phenomenon was repeated in the 1980s when Monkey Magic also gained a cult following. In the late 90s Siren Films released The Samurai as a DVD boxset.

The library has the dvd and online streaming video of the documentary "Shintaro! The Samurai Sensation That Swept a Nation" and also an e-book about Warriors of Medieval Japan

Image credit: Koichi Ose as Shintaro, Flickr Raj Arumugam


To view online videos you will be asked for your Swinburne username and password to login.
They are made available for educational purposes under Part VA of the Copyright Act 1968 and access is restricted to Swinburne staff and students only. 
The material is subject to copyright. Any further copying or communication may be the subject of copyright or performers' protection under the Copyright Act 1968 

 

Welcome OUA students

Posted December 01, 2014 in category General by Susan ROBERTS

Welcome to your library service! Use the library website to find a great collection of material on the shelves, and even more online. We have a growing online collection of e-Books, journal and newspaper articles, book chapters, industry profiles, annual reports, streaming media and much more.

Have a look around this website.

Find our contact details, great material for your assignment topics, referencing assistance and much more.

If you live too far away to visit in person and you love hard copy books, why not use our postal delivery service. Apply here:

http://www.swinburne.edu.au/lib/borrowing/oua.html

Of course you are welcome to use the library in person; just bring some photo ID with you, and your Swinburne student ID number.

Best wishes from the library team.